I am because we are

November 2015 marks exactly one year since I started blogging. My blog was largely inspired by the spirit of Ubuntu, an African philosophy that states, “I am because we are” and in some cases expressed as, “I am because you are”.  The Ubuntu philosophy that appreciates the interconnectedness of humanity; that our humanity is inextricably linked. Writing was therefore my platform to use my voice to add onto the efforts to challenge exclusion that deprives some groups of people from experiencing their full humanity, with the understanding that I cannot be free when others, particularly women continue to be bound. … Continue reading I am because we are

Every struggle needs feminism

“What is feminism?” is a question that I have been asked very many times.  Last week alone, I was asked the question three times.  As people ask this question, many do not hesitate to share their understanding of feminism with me.  The most common ones tend to be feminists as women who hate men, with intentions to be like men and go against nature by dominating over men. After responding to this question during a radio show last week, I got into a discussion with a feminist friend who had listened to the programme, and we both agreed how difficult … Continue reading Every struggle needs feminism

Between Rhetoric and Reality: Recognising the Struggles of Poor Women

 Photo credits:nairobinews.nation.co.ke The streets of Nairobi paint a clear picture population struggling to survive in a harsh economic environment.  Hawkers throng the streets at night, with resilience and determination to work beyond what is considered normal in a bid to make ends meet. In recognition and support of these hardworking Kenyans, particularly the women, I hardly ever miss an opportunity to buy groceries on the streets.  This also tends to be a convenient way to stock up at fair prices.  Recently, as I was walking on the streets I decided to buy some groceries.  After my shopping was packed, I reached … Continue reading Between Rhetoric and Reality: Recognising the Struggles of Poor Women